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The Problem with “Spiritual but not Religious”

Photo by Flickr user followtheseinstructions

Photo by Flickr user followtheseinstructions

I’ve added some Canadian context to Rabbi David’s words just to make sure we’re not just talking ‘American’ here.  Want a conversation starter for a confirmation class or youth gathering?  Use the article as a spring board to conversation.   – judy

By Rabbi David Wolpe – Reprinted from ideas.time.com

Do you like feeling good without having to act on your feeling? Boosting your self-esteem no matter your competence or behavior? Then I’ve got the religious program for you.

Increasing numbers of youth identify themselves as “spiritual but not religious.” In other words, they have some feeling, some intuition of something greater, but feel allergic to institutions. Yet as we approach Passover and Easter, it’s important to remember that it is institutions, not abstract feelings, that tie a community together and lead to meaningful change.

All of us can understand institutional disenchantment. Institutions can be slow, plodding, dictatorial; they can both enable and shield wrongdoers. They frustrate our desires by asking us to submit to the will of others.

But institutions are also the only mechanism human beings know to perpetuate ideologies and actions. If books were enough, why have universities?  If self-governance enough, let’s get rid of Ottawa, or Washington. The point is that if you want to do something lasting in this world, you will recall the wise words of French Catholic writer Charles Péguy: “Everything begins in mysticism and ends in politics.”    Got a vision? Get a blueprint.

Spirituality is an emotion. Religion is an obligation. Spirituality soothes. Religion mobilizes. Spirituality is satisfied with itself. Religion is dissatisfied with the world.

Religions create aid organizations; as Nicholas Kristof pointed out in a column in the New York Times two years ago
Aid organizations involve institutions as well, and bureaucracies, and — yes — committee meetings. There is something profoundly, well, spiritual about a committee meeting. It involves individuals trying together to sort out priorities, to listen and learn from one another, to make a difference. I have found too often that when people say, “I stay away from the synagogue — too much politics,” what they mean is that they did not get their way . Institutions enable but they also frustrate, as do families and every other organized sector of human life. If you want frictionless, do it alone.: the largest U.S.-based international relief and development organization is not Save the Children or Care, it’s World Vision, a Seattle-based (and Mississauga, Ontario-based) Christian organization.

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To be spiritual but not religious confines your devotional life to feeling good. If we have learned one thing about human nature, however, it is that people’s internal sense of goodness does not always match their behavior. To know whether your actions are good, a window is a more effective tool than a mirror. Ask others. Be part of a community. In short, join. Being religious does not mean you have to agree with all the positions and practices of your own group; I don’t even hold with everything done in my own synagogue, and I’m the Rabbi. But it does mean testing yourself in the arena of others.

No one expects those without faith to obligate themselves to a religious community. But for one who has an intuition of something greater than ourselves to hold that this is a purely personal truth, that it demands no communal searching and struggle, no organization to realize its potential in this world, straddles the line between narcissistic and solipsistic*. If the spirit moves you to goodness, that is wonderful. For too many, though, spirituality is a VIP card allowing them to breeze past all those wretched souls waiting in line or doing the work. Join in; together is harder, but together is better.

*Solipsism: Philosophy. 1. the theory that only the self exists, or can be proved to exist. 2. extreme preoccupation with and indulgence of one’s feelings, desires, etc.

 

Judy Steers

About Judy Steers

Judy Steers is the Coordinator for Youth Initiatives for the Anglican Church of Canada. Since 1999, she has also been the program director of the “Ask & Imagine” youth theology and leadership program at Huron University College. Her ministry has included camping ministries, consulting and teaching, parish ministry and she is a trainer with Godly Play Canada. Whenever possible she engages her passions for singing, drumming, outdoor adventure, off-the-wall ideas and whimsical creativity into her life and ministry working with teens and young adults, including two of her own.

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