April 7, 2013 First Sunday after Easter | The Community
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April 7, 2013 First Sunday after Easter

This week’s readings

This is often called Low Sunday, not because it is particularly a low point, simply because of the contrast from the previous week of uniquely emotional and engaging liturgies.

In some communities, it is also a Sunday with low attendance for various reasons.

It is also the Sunday when we traditionally read the story of Thomas. After a Sunday of proclaiming this remarkable miracle of Jesus’ resurrection from the dead and the joy and proclamation and song that goes with it, now we get down to the hard question. Do we really believe this? Many Anglicans agree that Thomas gets a bad rap, that his response is reasonable. How do you preach about Thomas?

I am particularly drawn to the first part of this reading:

  • “Peace be with you”
  • “Receive the Holy Spirit”
  • “If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven”

Jesus is calling his followers out of this locked room, to go out and proclaim his resurrection by sharing peace and being ministers of reconciliation.

To me, the Easter season is the most underused time of our year. The readings are emphatic calls to follow Jesus and let God transform our hearts and souls. What call is pulling on your heart this Easter season?

Dawn Leger

About Dawn Leger

I am a priest in the Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, having served in Stouffville, Ontario. I think preaching is a profound and great privilege granted to us by God and our Church. I love the reading, the writing, the proclaiming, the dissecting and the dialogue. I also love to cook, sing, read and laugh, in no particular order.

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4 Responses to April 7, 2013 First Sunday after Easter

  1. I think I’m going to be focusing on the Revelation readings this Easter season (NOT from a “Left Behind” perspective!) – we certainly don’t spend much time with them, and yet here are a smattering of them in the lectionary. I enjoy this week’s introduction to the Revelation – it’s basically a statement of faith. And what a great place to be, especially following the renewal of baptismal vows on Easter Eve. Peace, grace, faith – so fully given. No wonder Thomas had doubts!

  2. I think I’m going to be focusing on the Revelation readings this Easter season (NOT from a “Left Behind” perspective!) – we certainly don’t spend much time with them, and yet here are a smattering of them in the lectionary. I enjoy this week’s introduction to the Revelation – it’s basically a statement of faith. And what a great place to be, especially following the renewal of baptismal vows on Easter Eve. Peace, grace, faith – so fully given. No wonder Thomas had doubts!

  3. This weekend, I’ll be filling in for @Megan_Collings-Moore at the University, where the tradition is to celebrate “Holy Humour” Sunday. It’s something new for me, though I know many observe it. That being said, we’re stepping outside of the lectionary, so I won’t be very helpful in this discussion–but if any of you have some great Holy Humour resources, I’d be interested to hear about them!

  4. Dawn Leger

    @Jesse-Dymond, I believe the United Church of Canada has Holy Humour resources.

    @LauraMarie, that is a great idea. I’d be anxious to read what you come up with.

    We are doing an “everything-but-the” baptism this Sunday. A 12 year old girl who was baptised at the hospital as an infant and was never officially received into the church. We will be reaffirming our baptismal vows, then anointing her and offering her the light of Christ.

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