Resting in God – a link to a lovely piece on the value of ordinary time | The Community
The Anglican Church of Canada home page
Sites at the Anglican Church of CanadaFind a ChurchFrequently Asked QuestionsStaff Listing

Resting in God – a link to a lovely piece on the value of ordinary time

Agricultural calendar from a manuscript of Pietro Crescenzi, written c. 1306

Agricultural calendar from a manuscript of Pietro Crescenzi, written c. 1306. Photo from Wikicommons.

One of the blogs I follow has a lovely piece today about the tremendous value of the longest season of the church year: ordinary time, these numbered Sundays after Pentecost that stretch into November. While the seemingly relentless green of the vestments can seem monotonous, there’s wisdom in the duration of this season. Michael Marsh, a priest in the diocese of West Texas, offers some worthwhile thoughts about how this season helps us learn to rest in God, and transform our everyday lives into prayer. Check out what he has to say at his blog entry “Sacred Monotony”.

What do you think? Does the long season of ordinary time help you to find your rest in God? Or do you find yourself longing for a feast that breaks the rhythm?

Matthew Griffin

About Matthew Griffin

I'm a priest serving in the Diocese of Niagara, with both a pastoral and an academic interest in the relationship between liturgy and theology. I enjoy reading, cooking, and spending time with my beloved and our young son.
This entry was posted in Liturgy and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Resting in God – a link to a lovely piece on the value of ordinary time

  1. I saw your comments in Popular Distractions – and just as a matter of curiosity, I wonder if you could tell me how many clergy (you guess) might saying the Daily Office these days?

    • Matthew Griffin

      Charlie, I wish I could offer a direct answer to that question. The clergy I’ve spoken with on this topic tend to fall into a couple of different camps. Some pray the office, and find it life-giving and a vital part of their ministry. Others have struggled with it as a discipline–often because of how alone it can feel–and are intentional about structuring time into each day for prayer and study of scripture. But as for numbers, well, I wouldn’t want to try to guess; I do suspect it varies a fair bit from region to region even within a diocese.

      What I am comfortable guessing is that I think a growing majority of clergy who pray the office are using either the BCP or resources other than the BAS: whether it’s Common Worship: Daily Prayer from the UK, or the weekday office from A New Zealand Prayer Book, or the Liturgy of the Hours, or one of Phyllis Tickle’s collection of fixed-hour prayer resources. I increasingly hear about the unwieldy nature of the BAS for the offices.

      A great introductory resource, for those interested in the office tradition, is Arthur Paul Boers’ lovely look at how the office is a gift, called The Rhythm of God’s Grace.

  2. It’s a delightful piece, very ‘stilling’. What a blessing on this day which providentially unites both Trinity Sunday and Father’s Day.

Click on a tab to select how you'd like to leave your comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *